Happiness is…

…an unending interview with Viru Sehwag.

I’d thought, while posting on the first part yesterday, that even Sehwag would be hard put to top that effort. Boy, was I wrong — part two, today, is a laugh a minute then think for two roller coaster ride through Viru’s weird and wonderful world.

To isolate one gem from a diadem is to do the interviewee a disservice, but still: I read through this with a broadening smile, and at one point burst out laughing. This one:

What about being in the zone? Tendulkar said that what people call the zone, he calls the subconscious mind. “… All you need to do is look at the ball and play and the body is going to react. The concentration is such that you don’t think of anything else.” What’s your definition of being in the zone?

I have asked him many times what the zone is. He tells me that’s when “I see nothing except the ball”. I ask how that is possible. I have never felt something like that. I have asked Rahul Dravid the same thing. He says sometimes when he is in really good form, he sees only the ball – and not the sightscreen, the non-striker, the umpire or who is bowling, he just sees only the ball. But I have never entered that zone even if I’ve scored triple-centuries twice. Maybe I will enter that zone they talk about in future.

Only a Sehwag could have tossed in that reference to his triple centuries with such a precisely calibrated mix of insouciance and self-deprecation. And only a Sehwag would remain blissfully unaware that the zone is his natural state where, for the others, it is something to aspire to and occasionally attain.

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15 thoughts on “Happiness is…

  1. While going through the interview, I was actually reminded of the character you had created for Bhim, as far as the mental make-up is considered. “Whats the fuss all about? Go there and do your stuff” – sort of thinking.
    Prem, ever given a thought of doing a Mahabharat and Cricket fusion? 🙂
    Fab Five are already created for you to begin with.

  2. “Let me give an example: I was batting on 291 at Chepauk, against South Africa. I told Paul Harris, “Come round the wicket and first ball I’ll hit you for a six.” He accepted my challenge and the very first ball I hit him for a straight six, and there was a long-off, long-on, deep midwicket and a deep point. I was so tired and he was bowling on the pads and I was getting bored. So rather than spending 10-15 minutes to get to the triple-century I gave him good advice.”

    I think this one would have made Paul Harris really squirm

  3. Simply delicious read…it takes lot of guts to admit ones doubt and insecurities against fast bowlers…but my favourite bit is:

    “Let me give an example: I was batting on 291 at Chepauk, against South Africa. I told Paul Harris, “Come round the wicket and first ball I’ll hit you for a six.” He accepted my challenge and the very first ball I hit him for a straight six, and there was a long-off, long-on, deep midwicket and a deep point. I was so tired and he was bowling on the pads and I was getting bored. So rather than spending 10-15 minutes to get to the triple-century I gave him good advice.”

  4. Viru bhaiyya ki suno kahani
    Bolte hain woh hindustani

    Jab sab bole ‘zone’ ki gita-pitar
    Viru bhaiya ne kaha, zone kidhar?

    Sab dhoondhte reh gaye, to bhaiyya bole
    ‘Zone’ chodo, bus chauka [4’s] chakka [6’s] lagao,

    Phir zone dekhenge!

  5. What are the thoughts you look to drive away?
    When I take guard, thoughts like “hit the first ball for a four or six” or “try to defend” enter my mind time sometimes. That is a time when my mind is preoccupied with various thoughts. But if my mind is blank, then I will play according to the merit of the ball. So if I’m singing a song, I concentrate hard on getting the right lines and finding a rhythm. And when I’m concentrating on something I’m automatically concentrating on the ball.

    Isnt’t this what other ppl say as being in zone – having a mind blank and playing according to the merit of the ball?

    • Exactly. Also look at his comments about not being aware of sightscreen problems until someone fusses about it. The fun is that Sehwag is more often than not in the zone — the difference is that for him it is a natural state of mind, so he is not even aware that he is there, whereas for the others, it is a state to aspire to and occasionally attain.

  6. Pingback: Sehwag = Wawsomeness « The Puneri

  7. It was delight…Anybody else speaking so frankly would have generated a number of controversies…Not with Sehwag though

  8. It is amazing how he just breaks down everything in to simple things! Superb interview.

    Loved the Paul Harris bit .. LOL!

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